- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Stephen Lyn Bales, editor

Friday, August 30, 2013

Let's go (jelly) fishin' at Ijams



It's freshwater jellyfish season! And we know they can be found in Mead's Quarry Lake, so let's go look for them.


UT Students look at jellyfish in a jar.
There is only one species of freshwater jellyfish (Craspedacusta sowerbii) in the world. Although they are not native to Tennessee or even North America, they have made the jump across the big pond, a.k.a. the Atlantic.

They were first discovered in Mead's Quarry Lake in the late 1990s. The News Sentinel's Morgan Simmons wrote a story about their discovery. I've seen them on past canoe trips there, but not this year...not yet. Being nickel-sized and transparent to translucent makes it a bit tough to find the Lilliputian hydrozoans. Tough, but not impossible.


Ijams member Brian Bonnyman
holds a jar of recently caught
freshwater jellyfish.
After two years on the bottom, living as tiny polyps, the medusa stage of the jellyfish's life usually occurs during the heat of late summer, early fall.

Ijams member, Brian Bonnyman, located several in a lake in Blount County while kayaking last Sunday. So, we know the season is right. (The jellyfish in the photos and video were caught by Brian.) 

We'll be canoeing for jellyfish three times in September.


Saturday, September 7, 8 a.m.
Friday, September 13, 5 p.m.
Saturday, September 28, 8 a.m.

Ijams provides the gear: canoe, paddles, life jackets, guide (That would be me). Fee: $15 for members, $17.50 for non-members. Space is very limited. 

To register call me at Ijams (865) 577-4717, ext. 119. 




- Story and photos: Stephen Lyn Bales, Rex McDaniel. Video: Rex McDaniel.  

video 


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